Category Archives: Photography

UWA magic (part I): Perspective

Kicking off a new series on Ultra Wide Angle (UWA) photography.  For this series, we will consider as UWA anything from 10mm to 24mm. UWA photography is wonderful but can be challenging. Exaggerated perspective, distorted edges and weird relationships between foreground and background objects are some of the features that can play for or against the composition. UWA lenses will exaggerate the depth of field, making background objects appear further from foreground ones than they actually are. That’s why UWAs don’t make good portrait lenses, as they exaggerate noses and foreheads. On the other hand, they are ideal to picture people in their environment. UWA lenses add drama to the images and can tell stories more forcefully due to their exaggeration of perspective. The images below were taken with Canon’s EF-S 10-22mm UWA lens on EOS 40D and EOS 7D cameras. These examples illustrate the use of UWA to emphasise perspective in a composition. 

Food photography V: NOBU Hong Kong, avantgarde Japanese cuisine

The NOBU restaurant in Hong Kong functions in the Intercontinental hotel and has magnificent views overlooking the harbor. Main chef Nobu Matushisa received classical training as a sushi chef in Tokyo, and lived in Peru and Argentina. One of the 25 NOBU restaurants all over the world, NOBU Hong Kong showcases Nobu’s signature dishes, as well as new creations using local ingredients with emphasis on freshness and surprise.

Here is the NOBU crew in action:

And here is one of the two dinner set menus offered by NOBU Hong Kong. Outstanding, sublime japanase delicacies from the ocean and the land, prepared in a superb cross-over, modern style. All photographs taken with the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and EF 24mm f/1.4 L II lens with available light.

 

Food photography IV: Hutong Restaurant, Hong Kong

The Hutong restaurant in the Kowloon peninsula is one of the seven upscale outlets run by the Aqua Restaurant Group in the city of Hong Kong. On the 28th floor of One Peking Road in Tsim Sha Tsui, it offers an exquisite decor inspired in antique China alongside breathtaking views over Victoria Harbour. Traditional Northern Chinese cuisine with a contemporary twist.

Two of its classic dishes are featured here photographed with the Canon EOS 7D and EF 24mm f/1.4 L II lens using available light.

 

Beautiful Tasmania (Part III): Land and ocean

his last installment of the photo series on Tasmania is about its dramatic coastline. Here are some images taken in Tasman Peninsula, with spectacular views across to Cape Pillar, Cape Raoul, a late night shot of the famous Remarkable Cave and a view of Crescent Bay and its beautiful beach from above Mt. Brown.

The first two shots used a  Galen Rowell’s Graduated Neutral Density Filter (3 stops, soft edge) from Singh Ray to tame sky highlights and balance the foreground. The Remarkable Cave shot was taken late at dusk and needed a 6 sec exposure on a tripod to get enough light and, at the same time, soften the texture of the waters coming into the cave.

This is truly a gorgeous place, with endless opportunities for landscape photography. Not very crowded, as you can see. Highy recommended!

 

Strange Fruit in Singapore’s China Town

Melbourne-based performing arts company “Stange Fruit” appeared at the Chinese New Year celebration in Singapore’s China Town on January 27, 2011. Perched atop 5-metre high flexible poles, the troupe bends and sways in the air at pace with intriguing bits of new-agish music. The first half of their 25 minute performance at thet heart of Singapore’s China Town is shown here, captured with the EF 24L II lens wide open on the EOS 7D.

Beautiful Tasmania (part II): Marsupials on the run

Not unusual to encounter a great variety of marsupials in Tasmania, particularly if you find yourself in a nature park, such as the Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary. A prime example of true Tasmanian fauna, the famous Tasmanian Devil, is not as devil-looking as one might think, here caught sniffing out the mid morning air.


A Spotted-Tail Quoll run frantically in circles around his domain. A Koala, quite a bit calmer by nature, stared flematically at some point in the distant horizon from a vantage point by his favorite tree.

And, of course, the ubiquitous kangaroo, or at least one of the many varieties of it. Here in a close-up portrait, with his own body bokehing away in the background.

For this day, I just took my Canon EF 100mm L f/2,8 IS macro lens mounted on the EOS 7D. A combination that proved very suitable for capturing these animals at relatively close range.

Fully open, this lens allows excellent subject isolation and high speed. The Quoll shot was one frame of a series that saw the 7D bursting away at 8 fps.